VideoBros | Life, Love, Video.

The Death of Netflix's DVD Mailers and Dustin's Baby Dilemma

January 04, 2024 VideoBros | life. love. video. Episode 30
The Death of Netflix's DVD Mailers and Dustin's Baby Dilemma
VideoBros | Life, Love, Video.
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VideoBros | Life, Love, Video.
The Death of Netflix's DVD Mailers and Dustin's Baby Dilemma
Jan 04, 2024 Episode 30
VideoBros | life. love. video.

Have you ever caught yourself in an oversized t-shirt, reminiscing over the fashion choices of your teenage years, or puzzling over the bitterfuckingsweet transition from DVD to streaming, and how it's reshaped our access to movies? Our latest episode wades through the nostalgia of past trends, the practicality of comfort over style, and the sentimental value of physical media collections. We even take a whimsical-ass detour into hypothetical career shifts, from the film industry to DIY home improvement disasters, all while sharing stories that remind us just how fucked life's journey can be. Whether it's musings on the potential of an erotic bookstore venture or reflecting on the preference for a ZEISS CP3 lens over the CP2s, this conversation is as diverse as it is entertaining. And yeah, AI wrote most of this episode description. You think we're gonna put fucking pen to paper? I don't think so.

Support the Show.

Show Notes Transcript Chapter Markers

Have you ever caught yourself in an oversized t-shirt, reminiscing over the fashion choices of your teenage years, or puzzling over the bitterfuckingsweet transition from DVD to streaming, and how it's reshaped our access to movies? Our latest episode wades through the nostalgia of past trends, the practicality of comfort over style, and the sentimental value of physical media collections. We even take a whimsical-ass detour into hypothetical career shifts, from the film industry to DIY home improvement disasters, all while sharing stories that remind us just how fucked life's journey can be. Whether it's musings on the potential of an erotic bookstore venture or reflecting on the preference for a ZEISS CP3 lens over the CP2s, this conversation is as diverse as it is entertaining. And yeah, AI wrote most of this episode description. You think we're gonna put fucking pen to paper? I don't think so.

Support the Show.

Speaker 1:

I'm starving.

Speaker 2:

Why are you starving?

Speaker 1:

I'm doing it fast, oh, I've been eating all year.

Speaker 2:

Nice.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, this is day three. It's not great, it's not enjoyable, wow, but I've had too much enjoyment in life up to this point.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, I got to scale back the enjoyment. It's funny because when you first popped up on my screen I said you looked healthy and good.

Speaker 1:

Yeah. So I was like oh, did I tell you I was fasting?

Speaker 2:

I had no idea.

Speaker 1:

You know what it is. It's because I'm not just wearing oversized white t-shirt Like my. Mostly what I wear because I don't leave the house is that's not true. I do leave the house. Usually. I wear undershirts like Hanes and they're like 5X or something, which is, you know, I mean, I'm fat, but I'm not that fat. I like them to fit like a dress. Then the idea is I'm just supposed to sleep in that, but then I end up wearing it all day. So, like most of the time you know you and you see me, I just look fucking, you know, like I have no pride in my appearance because I don't.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, when I was a teenager, I would wear white undershirts like all the time as a shirt. Yeah, and it drove my mom crazy, she would say. She would say go put on a real shirt. And looking back I think she was right. Looking back, I think she was. She was 100 percent right.

Speaker 1:

Well, you can wear that look and it doesn't have to be an undershirt, like you can buy a white shirt.

Speaker 2:

Right.

Speaker 1:

You know, that's like a little bit thick, like an undershirt is just very thin fabric. She can buy a white shirt that like looks like real clothes.

Speaker 2:

Yeah.

Speaker 1:

But I used to love that. Look like with the, you know like where they put the cigarette in the sleeve and right you know like I thought that was so fucking cool.

Speaker 2:

That's a timeless look. That's a dope look.

Speaker 1:

I still like that look, but you have to be fit, it's not it. If you're obese, it's not as good of a look.

Speaker 2:

It's not as good of a look and it's not as good of a look when people can see your nipples for the shirt.

Speaker 1:

That's not good.

Speaker 2:

You know what I mean. And I don't mean like they're just like it's poking out a little, because mine do that all the time, but I mean like, like you don't want people to be able to see like the color of your areolas.

Speaker 1:

Who do you think is the best dressed fat guy?

Speaker 2:

Best dressed fat guy?

Speaker 1:

I don't know, I guess I've never.

Speaker 2:

Dilo, dilo.

Speaker 1:

Cilo, Cilo Green oh. Cilo Green yeah maybe he knows how to dress his body. He always looks fashionable. I mean, he's mostly wearing, like you know, sheets or something, but it looks good.

Speaker 2:

I just heard him sing. He sang a version of Kung Fu Panda, if I'm not or not. In the movie Kung Fu Panda they play that everybody was Kung Fu fighting, but I think they re-recorded it with him and I think I so I think I just heard him the other day, but before that I hadn't really thought about him in a really long time.

Speaker 1:

You know what I used to really like that movie. I mean, I guess I still would if I saw it again. I don't know how it holds up, but you know that Chris Farley movie. Tommy Boy where he's a no, the one where it's that song Everybody was Kung Fu. You know where he's one of his last, not his last movie, but it's one of the later Beverly Hills Ninja.

Speaker 2:

Oh I might have seen that one time, like a long time ago, but honestly, like I couldn't tell you anything about it, I should watch it, though.

Speaker 1:

Well you should watch it tonight, Maybe show it to your kids? Do you feel like like sometimes I think about old movies that I liked when I was like younger? They'll like I should watch that again. And then I'm like, well, if I had kids, I'd watch it with them, I'd show it.

Speaker 2:

Yeah Well, I just did that.

Speaker 1:

And without having kids, I'm like would you show your kid D2, Mighty Ducks. I assumed they watched the first one too.

Speaker 2:

I tried to show them the first one a while back and they weren't very interested and I thought to myself I feel like I was. When D2 came out. I was like, oh, this one's like a little bit better, or like, I don't know, as a kid maybe it wasn't better. As a kid I was like, oh, this one's like more exciting, or whatever you know. So I tried that one and they made it a lot further through. My youngest fell asleep, but my oldest watched, he put up with it and then he kind of lost interest. I was originally going to show them Angels in the Outfield, which apparently is not available for streaming in my area at all. I don't know why. And then, even if I wanted to buy it, I'm not sure that I could.

Speaker 1:

Can I tell you I'm so, I'm so upset about Netflix DVDs going away their DVD and Blu-ray in the mail thing and I know like for the last 10 years I've had it. You know like I got it in college, I'm like almost 37. So I've had it since college and for the last at least decade. When I say that to people they go that still exists.

Speaker 2:

I think a lot of people don't even remember that it was a thing.

Speaker 1:

I don't understand why it's not like what? Like? What do you do if you just want to see an old movie? People like, oh, you have Netflix. Netflix has like fucking 1% of the movies that have existed in the universe. There's so many. Like, if you just decide, I want to watch every Academy Award winner going back since the 1930s, where the fuck are you going to find them? You could get them on Netflix mailed to your house. Now you can't find them. And then it's like oh so I was paying, you know, $15 a month or $18 a month or something, and movies would come to my mailbox. Now I got to go to fucking Red Box at McDonald's and pick from five movie like whatever 10 movies they have in there. Or oh, every single time I want to watch a movie, it's $8, $10, $20, like it's, and it's streaming, and then you don't.

Speaker 1:

I think, you're approaching this all wrong. The internet goes out and you're fucked. I think that more and more movies are going to be hard to find unavailable. You're going to decide you want to watch something Like. You know what I want to watch right now? I want to watch News Radio. Can't find it.

Speaker 2:

It was at sitcom yeah.

Speaker 1:

Can't watch News Radio.

Speaker 2:

I never saw it. You know what though?

Speaker 1:

No one's streaming it. I know it's not a movie, but it's the same thing. Like content disappears and the more we are all attached to streaming, the more content is just going to be like hey, if you want, if you have a memory and you want to go find it, go fuck yourself. It's not there.

Speaker 2:

That's how I felt about. Uh uh, what was that show Boston Public, that David E Kelly show?

Speaker 1:

I used to watch that show.

Speaker 2:

All the David E Kelly stuff is very hard to find. Like good luck finding that. Uh, I would recommend to you on the movie front though, I would just say go on eBay. People sell Blu-rays on eBay and they're so cheap, dude, it's probably. It's probably a way better way for you to do this versus like cause. Then you could just own the movie forever and you could probably get away with spending about as much as you would at Netflix per month If you just switched over to just buying stuff off at eBay, I mean I was.

Speaker 1:

it'll definitely cut First of all at Netflix. I was renting. I don't necessarily want to own every movie, just cause I want to watch it one.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, but you're saying like this stuff is going to disappear, like right, I should start. If you're serious about wanting to have those movies around forever, you're probably just going to have to suck it up and start building a library start building that stupid library that we all had when we were 14.

Speaker 1:

I've done the thing where I started building a library of DVDs and then started replacing them with the library of Blu-rays, and now I'm replacing them with the library of four K's and honestly, I think it would be easier to just gouge my eyes out and stop fucking watching movies. It never ends.

Speaker 2:

Well, it is a, it is a business cycle. It's like when Apple's like hey, we have a new connector for your phone, we're switching over to this cable, so now you need to buy a new phone If you want to be able to charge it.

Speaker 1:

You know by the way, the new four K Blu-ray of pulp fiction that just got remastered. It looks so fucking good, like I know film is great or whatever, but I guess it still is. It's for a movie that age to have the image quality that is so clean and so sharp. It's from a time when, like like now, when somebody shoots something in film, they want to make sure you know that they've shot it in film. So anybody that shoots on film, they're like a lot of times they're doing a push, two stops or something, like they're making sure it's green, they're making sure it has all that texture or whatever.

Speaker 1:

There was a time in film where they were trying to make film like they were trying to make it as perfect as they could. They were trying to like how can we have super low noise, super sharp, super accurate colors? And then you know, after digital came around, well, nobody really wants that because if they want that look, they'll just shoot on digital. But there's a time period, like in the early nineties, where movies that were shot on film are so fucking clean and crisp that you're like this looks, this looks like a modern, like it looks like a you know an Alexa LF on it Like. It looks so clean. And another movie that was shot on film. Have you seen Backdraft? You know Backdraft? Uh, I think, yes, I think I have seen it, but it's been out so long.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, some of those scenes are just so, hmm, pristine, just the lighting, the color, it's so smooth. So you know there's no gr Like when you. When I think of film, I think of you know, like a pretty dirty image on purpose. It's pretty whatever, but it's just, it's so clean. Harry and the Henderson's dude that movie holds up Like you wouldn't your favorite movie.

Speaker 2:

You wouldn't think a stupid like family Bigfoot movie with John Lithko would look really good. But if you watch that movie now it's incredible, like how good it still looks. I think it looks great. It's a great looking movie. They did a good job with that.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, I guess uh, gotta be honest, I'm not going to go back and watch it. I watched it for you like a year or two ago for the first time, just because you bring it up so much. Yeah, but I mean, if you look at the pig, yeah, I'm not saying it has the world's best plot or anything.

Speaker 2:

I'm just saying like when you look at the quality of the movie, it's like oh, that's a good looking movie.

Speaker 1:

Hey, you know what I'm going to phone call and I have to take it because this is the guy I'm going to be working for, all right. Uh, let's pause the clock. I'll call you back, all right. That's a good call and we're back. I don't know how you're going to edit that out, but I just took a phone call and it was about my show and, uh, you know, not my show, but the show I'm working on, and it's been pushed back a week, so I have another week of not earning money to survive.

Speaker 2:

Ah, yeah.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, great.

Speaker 2:

Hey, I looked up your. I looked up your show.

Speaker 1:

We started watching it. It's way better than I thought it was going to be.

Speaker 2:

It's better than yeah, it's better than you made it sound. I mean, I only watched like a trailer, but I was kind of just looking for like quality or like what I thought based on the trailer. It doesn't look, uh, it doesn't look half bad.

Speaker 1:

I will say, um, you know, we started watching it and uh, it does seem that that, uh, all black streaming platform, uh, they just like, by the time the video gets into my living room, it's way more compressed and shitty looking than, you know, hulu and Netflix and and all the other ones. So I don't know, it's kind of like man, the show doesn't look that good, but I but I'm also like, well, it also looks like standard definition. So I don't know if they're they're compressing their file, they're just like they're, they're they're just throttling their bandwidth too far, or is it possible that somebody actually delivered it that way? I doubt it. But, um, yeah, the show's not bad and it's also not the plot that was described to me. Yeah, I mean, uh, I'm sure it costs a lot of money for those platforms to be able to send out, you know, really high quality video to a bunch of houses.

Speaker 2:

If they're new. I would imagine they'll. Eventually, when they have enough money or something, maybe they'll do something about it.

Speaker 2:

Maybe they'll splurge a little more or whatever. But like I guess, when you're just starting, it's like you just bet on the fact that most people don't really care or notice. Like when I see all that banding in the blacks, you know, on Netflix and stuff, I'm always like man, what the hell? And my wife's like what? Like they, it's almost like people don't notice it. And I'm like how do you not notice it? It's right there, you can see it, right. And she's like I guess. I'm like what do you mean? You guess Either you can see it or you can't. But like most I, most people, I I realize like people just don't care or notice, like they just don't Like what's important to us, just it's just not important to other people, which is fine.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, there's been like I can't think of an example right now, but there's times when I'm watching something and something seems so bad to me that I'm like, oh my God, what was that? And somebody else in the room was like what was what?

Speaker 2:

Yeah, I pointed out.

Speaker 1:

I didn't see that.

Speaker 2:

Yeah.

Speaker 1:

Oh, okay, Speaking of what was that fuck movie I'm editing on right now, man, Do you feel like it's much, much more difficult to do bad work as far as like to force yourself to sit there at the computer and keep working on something that you know is bad?

Speaker 1:

I do Like if I was doing something that was like this is really good and I really like the way it's going or whatever. It would be a lot easier for me to just, you know, keep working away and getting it done and stuff. But like when every single change we're making I think it's like embarrassing, like like the further I get into this edit, the more I'm like I wonder if I could talk to him about using a nom de plume, which is, you know, a fake name. Like I really want people to know I was involved with this.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, sometimes. Sometimes I won't put, like when I do wedding video stuff. Sometimes I won't put the films about love logo at the end if I don't like the video.

Speaker 2:

Right, because you're like, what is something fun that I was involved with this yeah, or like yeah, it mostly happens when I've had somebody else edit, like shooting at it for me, and then I'm like, yeah, this isn't really particularly a good example of what I would do, so then they send me the video and then I just chop off the logo and re-export it. Right, it doesn't matter. I guess that stuff doesn't really matter. But yeah, like when I'm working on something that I'm like this isn't gonna be my best work, then it's hard to it's hard to just even slog through it and get through it, you know, because you're like this isn't really, this isn't even in the top. You know 25% of what I do and I feel like if every project isn't better than the last, it's hard to work on.

Speaker 1:

Mmm yeah, and when, once you're 15 years in, that gets to be, that starts to be a real curse cuz it's well, it is a challenge. I don't. I try not hit a plateau at a certain point.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, I mean I try not to take it too seriously, but Cuz like, I know that like especially shooting weddings, it's like you get what you get, like some events are just awesome and some events are just not as good. And so now with like wedding stuff, I don't really I don't really stress about it that much Because I'm literally just providing a service to people. But I think if I was making movies, that would be a way different thing where, like if I started working on one and I was like oh no, this isn't as good as my last one, I do be I'd be like I, I don't know if my I might give up. Yeah, you know that feeling.

Speaker 1:

The other, thing that's happening is like I've got the editor and not that. I got the director sitting here and he's saying to do things that I think are terrible and then he goes. What do you think After I do it? And I just gave him to go like your movie man, what do you think?

Speaker 2:

Yeah, but he's asking, he's asking you what you think. Maybe you should tell him. I mean, if you think that the main character has too many asthma attacks, then you might just need to sell them.

Speaker 1:

like I don't use crossfades, I think crossfades are corny, so Stop telling me to put in crossfades.

Speaker 2:

If you can't solve it, dissolve it.

Speaker 1:

There's a oh my god, there's also. We're putting in a lot of stock footage In between things and like, like, just some of the. They're just, it's, it's. Everyone is just so creative. Um, how was your Christmas?

Speaker 2:

It was pretty good. I didn't get the earth's a 12k like I asked my wife for, but what are you?

Speaker 1:

gonna. You asked her to buy it for you. That was not gonna happen.

Speaker 2:

I Figured it was worth a shot. Hmm, it wasn't she did give me permission to buy a gun.

Speaker 1:

She had bought you a brand new one, would you have been like oh?

Speaker 2:

Yeah, because I can get the one that I want for like five grand on eBay. So she went out and spent seven on it or something I would have been like. What the?

Speaker 1:

hell, you would have been like fuck man.

Speaker 2:

This guy actually is hurting our family she would have spent seven on Less stuff, like I would get more stuff with this other other purchase, so Right, but I mean I wouldn't have complained.

Speaker 1:

You also would not Really have wanted your wife to be shopping on eBay for some well, the thing is the thing is is well, the thing is is I Center the link. Yeah, she probably should have been on that but she, she, just like she.

Speaker 2:

Every time I tell her how much a memory card is or Something, she just shakes her head Like yeah, what, what? Oh, have you?

Speaker 1:

seen people are doing that on YouTube. They put their camera rig in front of their wife and they're like guess how much this cost, guess what's this cost. I think dudes are just robbing their wives blind.

Speaker 2:

I can't believe I didn't think of that first. Oh yeah, I mean it's a great concept, for I've seen it too many times now, but like, it is not a concept that I'm interested in, because that just seems like you're asking for trouble. I Think it makes for a funny video the first time you see it and then, but now I've seen a bunch of people do it and I'm like, okay, like I get it. Yeah, yeah, fun. Funny the first time, not not so funny the 19th time.

Speaker 1:

So I'm wrapping up this. I don't know if you can tell I'm working the whole time or podcasting. I'm wrapping up this project that I worked on for a couple of months and I'm just like I'm basically trying to walk away from it. So I'm making like an archive, so if I have to open it up, like 10 years from now, I can get right back into it or something. I mean, I'm not gonna be alive in 10 years, but there's a surprising amount of missing assets and I don't know why. Anyway, that's not interesting to a podcast audience.

Speaker 1:

You should make a podcast where you just sit there and work my wife started talking about having a baby, which I thought was off the table, and thought I'd squash that bug a long time ago, and so I had a little bit of a crisis over Christmas because, like, I Don't really think I could continue trying to pursue a film career and also have a baby. So If she was gonna make me do this, it would have been nice if she brought this up before we sold our house and moved across the country to somewhere I wouldn't want to raise a family.

Speaker 2:

The thing about women and babies is that a lot of women seem to. They seem to think that it's gonna make them happy and I think that's the like, the evolutionary part of people when they're like I gotta have a kid, like this thing turns on in their brain. That's like, hey, have a kid. I.

Speaker 1:

Mean. I think part of it is she's like really afraid that I guess kind of getting to be now or never because of our age and I think she's just like really afraid that she's gonna have a bunch of regret later If we don't does Does.

Speaker 2:

Is she the kind of person that really loves kids and and wants to be around kids all the time? Because I would say, if not, I.

Speaker 1:

Mean she's very, very nurturing. And like if you, if I was gonna say, if you've met her, you've met my wife, but you don't really know her that well, if you knew my wife really well, you would be like if she seems motherly, she seems very motherly. I mean, like it would be if you just met her, you, and got to know her, you'd be like I'm shocked that you don't have kids nurturing. I think that the thing is she does have that's not the question, though.

Speaker 2:

The question is does she go out of her way to be around kids? I?

Speaker 1:

Mean what out of her way.

Speaker 2:

Does she?

Speaker 1:

who goes out of their way to be around kids.

Speaker 2:

So it's like like well people who well? First of all, I think it's different with women. Well, first of all, women who don't have kids but who, like they try to become a school teacher or they try to, they do a lot of babysitting or they, like she finds a way to like be around kids because she likes them so much.

Speaker 1:

Is that? That's not. That's not happening, okay Well, but like, when we're somewhere and they have a kid, she likes it and I'm like, don't give me that thing. Anyway, the truth is, she's not even sure she wants one either. She just wanted to make sure that we can all be really fucking stressed about it for Christmas.

Speaker 1:

Yeah cuz she's like I still don't know either, but I just want you know like I'm thinking about it all the time and and there's just, I feel like there's a lot of pressure on me and I always thought I would be mom and I don't have any regrets later and I just don't know, even know what our life looks like if we're not like she. And I don't know. She says she feels like she doesn't have a purpose. Right now I'm like your purpose is my film career, just kidding.

Speaker 2:

I shouldn't say I know a lot, but I know some women who Say they want kids and then once they have a kid, they didn't really want the kid as much as they thought they wanted the kid, and Then it becomes your responsibility to take care of the kid.

Speaker 2:

Like I have a friend, like a legitimate, illy a friend, who his wife as opposed to an illegitimate friend wanted three kids and they had the first two and he's like I don't know, I'm good with two and she wasn't really I wouldn't say she wasn't taking care of the kids because she she was, but like she would find any excuse to not have to take care of the kids and Like she would kind of sluff a lot of work off onto him. And he was like I don't think I want a third kid and she wanted a third kid and they had a third kid and Now he's like doing a, like I would say he's taking the full brunt of three kids. So it's like she got what she wanted. It's kind of like here's.

Speaker 2:

It's like when a woman wants a dog, you know, and you're like are you gonna take care of it? And they're like yeah, and then three months later you're in the yard picking up with a poop and taking the dog for a while, like you're doing everything, and you're like I and. And it's like, and then she texts you and she's like did you feed the dog? And you're like I no, why would I feed the dog? That I never wanted, but now it's your thing. I would say that would be the thing that I would be very concerned about if she's not going, if she's not going out of her way to be around kids like Kids is not kids. Kids are kind of fun sometimes, but they're a lot of work and I found that some people just don't like the work of it.

Speaker 1:

Well, how about this? She bought a book that's like supposed to help you decide whether or not you should have a kid. You know, it's like all the pros and cons and like you know, I think it's supposed to like it's not, for I mean I haven't read it, but supposedly like it's not judgy, it's just like, hey, it's right for some people and not right for other people, and let's help you figure it out. And she has not read the book.

Speaker 2:

It's been on her nightstand now for dude like half a year and she has a funny, she has cracked it and she has read like six other books in the meantime.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, like she's, she's become like. In the last year my wife has become a big reader and she's reading like, like novels that are like the you know the popular novels of the year. You know they're not like classic literature or whatever, they're just like. This is the number one book that Ladies are reading right now that are in her age group. So it's like she's definitely making time to read, but she's not reading that book. So I don't know why we have to fight about this on Christmas. I.

Speaker 2:

Was gonna say if you had to buy that book, I kind of know what the answer should be. But then when you tell me that she hasn't even read the book, dude, I went into having kids, being like totally, I was like 50 50 about it. And then after like literally like a month after we got married, my wife is like let's have a baby. And we were fit, we were both supposedly 50 50 of like maybe we'll have a kid, maybe we won't, or whatever. And then, and then a month after we got married, she just was like let's definitely have a kid and I was like this feels you told me it happened on your honeymoon.

Speaker 2:

No, I even think, you guys that far.

Speaker 2:

Well, our honeymoon was three months after we actually got married, but no, it didn't happen on our like. We didn't get pregnant on our honeymoon, but she, like a month after we got married, she's like let's definitely have a kid. And I was like trying to like Say, hey, wait, wait a minute, maybe we could wait like a couple years or something like. Yeah, it felt, it definitely felt like a bait and switch kind of thing or like a trick of some sort. Uh-huh, yeah, it's a the rug out from dude. All I'll say is it's a lot of work. I Will say one is easier than two people act like oh, the more kids you have, like, the easier it gets, like.

Speaker 1:

I don't think that's the case, but yeah, so if I end up having to have a kid, what do you think I should do for a living? Because it's not gonna be this. I'm not gonna keep Like, I'm not gonna try to like. This job I'm about to do is 12 hour days. It's 12 hour days and most jobs in the film industry. When you're trying to get a job, if you ask what time is work over, they won't hire you because that's like a red flag of like oh, this guy doesn't know the industry. Because the answer is fucking never. We're gonna, you're gonna get never ends. It's a 17 hour day. It's a 20 hour day, like it's. Whatever. We fucking say yeah, like it's. It's unprofessional for you to ask what time work is over today. It's like how can you have a family like that?

Speaker 2:

How about this Steady kitchen and baths? I?

Speaker 1:

Don't want to do that.

Speaker 2:

Steady deck and framing. I.

Speaker 1:

Don't, honestly don't think I should take any job. That's physical, because I'm getting older, not younger. What I want to build a business and and go into something that my body is not gonna be able to do well, no, you could just cuz it cuz. Then I'm gonna be in my 60s and I'm gonna have to get a third career.

Speaker 2:

You're gonna have to hire a crew oh.

Speaker 1:

I see, build up a business and then run it out and crew it out.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, yeah.

Speaker 1:

I don't really want to do that type of stuff like I've. You know I because I do a lot of. I do a lot of Projects for my own properties, and by my own properties I mean the one house that I own. At a time that I live in and work in, I just spent my entire Christmas break trying to paint my cabinets. It went horribly wrong and not only are my Cabinets not like painted, I don't really have access to my kitchen anymore because that's how bad it went. That was 10 days of Just like unexpected problems. It took me almost a full day to well, not really, but I think like a couple hours one night and then, and then waiting a couple days to All. The stores were closed. I needed to get a saw blade that could cut metal, had to cut the dishwasher out. I had to cut the leg. I had to saw the legs off the dishwasher Because whatever fucking dipshit installed it originally.

Speaker 1:

Here's what you do when you put in a new kitchen you tile the floor, then you put the cabinets on top of the tile and you put the dishwasher on top of the tile. But what this cheap fuck did to save, like I don't know, $40 worth of tiles as they put in the cabinets and the dishwasher. And then they put in the tiles and now the dishwasher can't come out because it's boxed in between the countertop and the tile. So the only way to remove it is either remove your countertop, so get new countertops, or Take a hammer to all your tiles and take your hand, take your tiles out, or Cut the dishwasher in half, which is the option that I took, and then we're gonna get new countertops. Before I put in a new dishwasher, I'm gonna have to I Guess I'm gonna have to make all of my cabinets like half an inch taller. I'm gonna, I'm probably gonna put I guess I'm gonna have to put like a half inch sheet of plywood on top all my cabinets and then put New counters on that and then try to make that new sheet of plywood match the original cabinets by Putting in a bunch of like putty, you know, like wood filler, and then sanding and then painting the shit that I just fucking paint it Because some fucking asshole Didn't think about the fact that somebody might want to replace this dishwasher in 40 years.

Speaker 1:

So that's why I don't really want to start like a construction type of business, because every fucking project is like that. So you go to a job and you go like, okay, I'm gonna build this deck and I'm gonna charge you, you know, $10,000 or whatever. And then you go to dig a hole to pour your footer, your concrete footer, and then you find like, oh, there's a pipe here, so Now this pipe has to be moved if we're gonna build the deck here. And so now I got it. And there's one thing after like every fucking prod, every project just brings up 50 more projects, and I Don't want to get into that and I don't want to be.

Speaker 1:

You have to go to people's houses and like be in their home and like you know, it's just every fucking day you're taking a risk that you're gonna accidentally drop the ladder through their window or you're gonna what if the fucking deck cracks, if somebody falls off of it? Now there's like I just don't, I don't want that. That the that's a high stress situation and the fact that, like my body is not, it's not good. It's not good to do that kind of physical labor starting in your 40s. That's when you should be trying to find a way to do less physical work.

Speaker 2:

You should open an erotic bookstore. You look like the kind of guy that would own like an erotic toy slash.

Speaker 1:

I don't know how any of them make money.

Speaker 2:

Porn is free now, like porn is free, so well you do, like David is Think we've established that who's buying that?

Speaker 1:

I guess people that don't have access to Internet or something. I guess somebody is, but don't, that's not the line. Look, I'm going into the porn business. It's gonna be selling pictures of my butthole.

Speaker 2:

This the stelly butt fuckery. Come on down to steady but fuckery. Okay, but fuckery yeah, you didn't tell me you were gonna be working this whole time.

Speaker 1:

I can you tell that? Do you feel like the podcast is suffering in quality? Because I never really thought I was very good in the first place.

Speaker 2:

I Do edit out a lot of blank dead space.

Speaker 1:

Do you?

Speaker 2:

know it's not, it's actually not that bad. I mean, I do, I mean I feel that I'm doing.

Speaker 1:

I Feel like I'm bringing a lot to the table. I'm complaining about my wife and I'm talking shit about the people that have employed me to work on a television show, which is a dream of mine. You know, you got the whole dishwasher rant. That's good stuff, hey. So you know how? You called me that day to ask me what camera Like if you have any camera would you want? Blah, blah, blah. And I was like you know, I haven't really looked into them, like I'm not really obsessed with that right now, like I'm not, I'm looking for a career, I'm really looking for a camera, and you know my camera does everything. Well, anyway, you, you sent me down a fucking rabbit hole and now I'm ready to tell you what camera I think I would want to own. And then after that, I started looking at lenses and I came to the conclusion that I've always more importantly, I should probably just be asking about like which lenses do you want to own?

Speaker 1:

Yeah, so I went down that rabbit hole and I Ended up where I always end up, which is, I think the ZEI CP3s are the best lenses to own. Are you anything more expensive than that? You should just be a rental.

Speaker 2:

Why do you think they're that are worth double what the CP2s are?

Speaker 1:

All right. Well, they, the size, just there's their, their size of them. There they're Way fucking smaller. The housings a lot of people complained about the CP2. The wheels and stuff kind of didn't hold up over time and they were a little bit inconsistent from lens to lens. These, these ones, just the mostly the body, the small size, you know they're even more compact and I think that they I Think they have better coatings or something like. I think they've improved optically as well. Not that I've done like a lot of tests or whatever. I mean I don't have a ton of experience with them. I will say I shot on CP2s and I love them. I like the way they look a lot. There's a lot of people that kind of hate on them Because they're not, you know, they don't have that character Right like they're super sharp, they're super clean.

Speaker 2:

That's the thing that always comes up. Is the character like Zeiss. That that's the thing that everybody always says is they're just so clean and the end.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, People want a dirtier lens you know people want something a little warmer.

Speaker 2:

I guess my question is what? How does that make the Zeiss better than like an iRx lens which has a super clean kind of look to it at way like a way cheaper price?

Speaker 1:

For me all. Like all of those budgety ones, like I just don't see. I just don't see why I would rather have that versus just sticking with what I'm already shooting on, which are, you know, basically photography lenses. You know DSLR lenses, like I shoot on the Sigma Art zoom lenses and like, honestly, those are fine, they're pretty good, they're probably the best bang for the buck. The build quality is really nice, they're sharp, like realistically, I could keep shooting on those forever.

Speaker 1:

You know, the reason why I would want to move into cinema lenses is because you know better breathing and better focus pulling.

Speaker 1:

You know the focus rings with the hard stops that you know they're meant for cinema and so. But when you talk about like, like the DZOs and the Irox's and all those like, to me the image quality is not really, it's not really better than what I'm getting out of the Sigma Art, and so I don't think that it's worth spending the money to get into the. You know what I mean. It's like I'll just keep using what I have, which I think will be easier to resell and will hold their value, and you know I don't know. The other thing that sucks about lenses now is just like that we're getting into like a tower of Babylon situation with lens mounts and where there's just like more and more mounts and everybody's like no, all the new mounts just allow you to adapt so that you can use whatever mount you want with adapters. First of all, those adapters cost money and second of all, the adapters are. They just add two more failure points.

Speaker 1:

Like you have the original mount, then your adapter has two you know what I'm saying Like it used to be, because you put that one piece in the middle, it's actually two extra connections and you know I used to shoot on. So we had three or four black magic 6K Pro or we had a mixture of 6K, the original and 6K Pros, and then we had a 4K and for the 4K we bought an adapter.

Speaker 2:

And it wasn't even like Speed booster.

Speaker 1:

But it wasn't a speed booster it was a passive adapter, so it didn't even have glass in it. All it had to do was just be the connection.

Speaker 2:

And it couldn't even do that. It couldn't even fucking do that.

Speaker 1:

Well, you would get your image, but you would lose your aperture control and so you'd like disconnect the lens and click it back on and click it in, and click it back on, and click it in, and click it back on and like eventually you would get it. But it got to be so fucking frustrating. And this was buying one from. The adapter was from Viltrox and it was like not too much money. So we're like all right, this time, instead of buying, like you know, the $200 one, let's get the real one from Metabones, Cause they have such a strong brand and reputation. Everyone loves Metabones and everybody with the Pocket 4K has Metabones, so we get the fucking Metabones. It's like 500 bucks or 600 bucks or some shit.

Speaker 1:

Fucking same thing.

Speaker 1:

A month after using it. We can't get it to fucking and like. You know, if you're shooting in live events or whatever like, or even if it's not a live event, if you got a client there or if you got talent there, like it. There's never. I've never been on a set where efficiency with time didn't matter and so to sit there for me clicking and unclicking and disconnecting and reconnecting the lens over and over and over. And I don't think that just because it's a $35,000 camera instead of a $2,000 camera, that that problem is gonna go away. Like getting a red and you know, or getting like what, oh, I don't know. Like getting one of these cameras that has an RF mount or something, and then be like, oh, I'm gonna put a P, I'm gonna do RF to PL, or or I'm gonna adapt it to EF or whatever. I think they're all gonna have that fucking problem. And then there's also, just like it's a little bit of flex. You just feel it, you feel it moving, and I want my cameras to be stiff, I want my mounts to be hardcore. So then I'm like all right.

Speaker 1:

So let's say I had to finally decide I wanna buy a CP3s, do I buy EF or do I buy PL. Pl seems like. Well, I'm getting more and more into cinema cameras, I guess. But wouldn't it be nice to, on every job, decide if I wanna hey, on this job, I don't wanna take a risk with my $20,000 lenses, so I'm gonna bring my Sigma Art. Like I still see the value in having a more economical lens for certain jobs. Like if you know that you're gonna be, I don't know, shooting something where, like it's, maybe it's gonna get rained on. Or, you know, maybe we're gonna be in an area where if I walk around with too nice of a camera, I'm afraid of getting robbed. Like maybe you know we had to do some travel that I'm just like I just would feel more safe with a cheap lens. I don't know, I'd like to have the option.

Speaker 2:

When it comes to the EF PL thing, I kind of I kind of lean more to EF, just because I feel like anything I'm gonna shoot, even like anything good I'm gonna shoot, I'm still gonna probably use like a pocket 6k pro or something. And they do offer that in an EF versus. Well, I guess they just switched to the Leica R for the full frame one, which is kind of I, I don't know I that.

Speaker 1:

That decision really fucking bumped me out.

Speaker 2:

I well, it did it. It didn't it. Like on one hand I was like well, I was looking at the Leica R lenses so, like that's, I think those are an L? Mount, right, they're all L mount like I don't know those are advantages.

Speaker 1:

I don't know I haven't studied them that much how did you end up wanting those so bad?

Speaker 2:

I watched I've. I like the look of them and I was really into Matteo. What's his face from buttery LUT or whatever that, that guy he.

Speaker 2:

He's like a big fan of the Ursa 12k, which I'm a big fan of the Ursa's, and those are the lenses he uses and he shows like I've just watched a lot of this stuff and I'm like you know, his style is a little bit different than mine, but not crazy different. Like I'm probably a little more. He doesn't do a lot with grading, which is probably better, but I'm still kind of in a phase where I'm like I kind of want to go a little harder on the grading. So a lot of his stuff is maybe a little cleaner than I would like. But even he's like I really like the character of these lenses. They're they're clean but they have character. You know they're not as clean as like a zice or like you know, the other stuff out there.

Speaker 2:

So I don't know, I kind of like I don't. He was the one who kind of turned me on to him and but you know it's not like I've really made up my mind. I do kind of lean towards the EF just because there's so much stuff that can take an EF. But I I guess the PL's like, don't the PL's have a locking mechanism or something that allows them to just kind of lock on, it's a little more secure.

Speaker 1:

I've never they. Yeah, pl is designed here.

Speaker 2:

The problem is I've never had. I've never. I don't even know if that's a benefit. I've never had an EF lens like or anything. So it's like I don't know, that's kind of a moot point.

Speaker 1:

I feel like and wanting to be in the EF. Oh, the fact that I want to get CP3's, it's like those I'm. I'm specifically wanting those. One of the main reasons is how compact they are, so it's like that's not gonna be. They're lighter. They're lighter than the lenses I'm using now because, like now, I have zoom lenses. My zoom lenses that are, you know, dslr lenses are gonna weigh more than those compact prime Cinez are. So, yeah, that's not really an issue. The other thing is okay.

Speaker 1:

So you were asking me what camera would I want, and I ended up deciding, like, if I had the money and the means or whatever, and I was like, okay, I'm gonna buy like a real cinema camera. I think I would get a red raptor with the Vista vision 8k sensor, and then I would want the. I'd want the internal indies, which is like a fucking $3,500 upgrade. It's, it's basically it's. It's a, it's a PL mount with indies internally, and so if I went that route, I well, now I only have PL is my only option. They don't make. They don't make that with EF.

Speaker 1:

If you, you know, like where you can have internal indies? Internal indies, to me I've, like I just don't want to live without them. I think that has become so important to me, like it's just so practical. And it is kind of weird how, like for videographers and stuff, I think we put a, we put a pretty high importance on anything that makes our job easier, and I can high-end cinema stuff. They're almost like, they're almost against that, you know, like any tool, you know like autofocus or internal indies or I don't know just I can't think of anything else but like it seems like stuff like that that makes, that makes things easier for us to be successful, like in the cinema world. They're just like oh, that's not how we do things, we wouldn't do that.

Speaker 2:

It's like well, I mean, you could yeah you could do it that way yeah, this, yeah, it's one of those industries where there's a lot of like hubris.

Speaker 1:

For some reason yeah, people are stuck in their ways. And I also think there's a lot of like job security, like if we make things to like, if autofocus gets too good, then are we gonna need a first AC. You know right.

Speaker 2:

I.

Speaker 1:

I've told you already before how surprising it has been for me being on film sets out here. Not that I've been on a lot, but I've been on some sets out here and I've seen some things that are like shockingly inefficient. So I'm like I can't believe. Like I can't believe you're gonna do this every fucking day. You're gonna take that completely apart, instead of just getting a case that fits it put together yeah, yeah, and you're talking specific, like a gamble.

Speaker 1:

I've seen a guy I've seen a guy take a gimbal out of the package that it comes in and put it to get like he just bought it. But he didn't. This is his daily thing. He takes the gimbal out, builds it up from scratch, balances it.

Speaker 1:

Spends like a fucking hour doing this shit yeah just to shoot with it for a few hours and then completely breaks it back down like no dummy, just buy a case where you can leave it and then get to a point you can pull it out of the case and then balance it in like 30 seconds. And then, and they'll do that, they'll do that every day for six weeks in a row on a job.

Speaker 2:

I know I was gonna say he's on day 14 of the shoot. This is the 14th time he's done it. It's insane.

Speaker 2:

That is that is one thing it's fucking insane when I rented the DJI Ronin 4d and they sent it to me, I had to build the whole thing out and I was like, wait a minute, so when I send this back in three days I need to completely disassemble it and like put everything back in. Like all, like there's so many tiny little pieces and now when I have it, I just, I, just, I just leave it set up just by a case where it just plops right in, right and you don't have to literally build it from scratch. Like what a waste of time, what an insane waste of time. Especially, yeah, and you know, I guess somebody can make the argument about some of these, like area Lexers or whatever. Oh well, you know there's different configurations of different people are gonna want well, that's fine, but like this camera there, what? There is no different configuration, like the parts go where they go, like this is this notion that you're gonna you're gonna disassemble it every time.

Speaker 1:

It's just insane and like wildly inefficient and stupid that the quality of like, how nice the cases are that come with DJI stuff. It pisses me off because I'm like just put in a fucking cardboard box. I'm never gonna use this like. Why did you make something so perfect for this? Except it's not at all, because you have to completely disassemble it to get it back in there. I have the same thing with my, my tilt to float. It has this big padded case with like custom molding, like all this stuff.

Speaker 1:

But it's like okay, but as soon as I put it together to use it, I can't put it back in the case. So what was the fucking point of this fantastic case that doesn't fucking work for the way I'm anybody's ever gonna use it? And that's the thing between the, between the, the RS3 and the LiDAR and and the camera and the actual float, that fucking thing like. When I bought it, it probably took me good four or five hours to figure it like, to put it together like yeah, I could maybe do if I was doing it all the time, maybe I could get that a lot faster, but it's still like is too. This is too complicated for me to take it back into the. Put it back in the manufacturers packaging yeah, they could make.

Speaker 2:

They could just make the case designed to fit the finished product and it'd be like a. The case would be like four inches bigger in dimensions and a million time, not a million. That I feel like I'm giving you too much credit you're right, it would be a billion times it would be twice as useful.

Speaker 1:

Useful of a case useful? Yeah, because those cases I. They end up in storage until I'm ready to sell the thing and buy the you know RS4 or whatever the fuck context.

Speaker 2:

I was using the Ronin Ford. The Ronin 4d case isn't terrible, but you have to detach the side grips and stuff and I, like I got to the point where now I just seatbelt the thing into my car when I drive to my shoe yeah, we did, I'm just like I'd rather it just be ready when I get there that's what we used to do it.

Speaker 1:

We had the Ronin 2, which is the big one with the ring, you know, and we had a Scarlett W, a red, in it, and we would just strap it into the back like the seat, the seat behind the driver seat, and we would just seatbelt it in which, like, obviously you can't do that for anything, that's not a local job, but for a local job. And then for you know, if we had to fly somewhere or something, we would still like break it down into, like, you know, three parts or something. That, like we could, after we landed, we could put the thing together like we're not, we're not completely rebuilding it, you know, we could still put the thing together in like 15 minutes or 10 minutes or something. But what do I? What do I know?

Speaker 2:

I'm just a videographer yeah, that actually put me in a bad mood for some reason right, doesn't it?

Speaker 1:

don't you said, like after having this conversation, that you suddenly feel like life isn't worth living? I wish I lived in Colorado. Again, I'm kind of homesick for it. And then I go look at the home prices and I'm like, oh, maybe it's not even an option, so why am I even thinking of this?

Speaker 2:

Maybe you should look between Castle Rock and Denver, but either way you should definitely move back, because I kind of miss not having you here.

Speaker 1:

If somebody gets pregnant, we're probably going to.

Speaker 2:

Nice.

Speaker 1:

The schools around here, or like have you ever looked up your schools on? What is the website? Is it great? I think it's greatschoolscom or something.

Speaker 2:

Oh yeah.

Speaker 1:

And they rank them from like one to 10. Every school in Colorado is like an eight or nine and all the schools around where I live now are like a one or two, which didn't matter at all when I thought we were never having kids and when I was here for a film career. But if I have to have a family instead, it just would have been fucking nice to know that two years ago, before I gave up everything and spent hundreds of thousands of dollars relocating. Well, any resolutions for New Year.

Speaker 2:

I think my resolution I do have a resolution. I guess, if you could call it that, it's more of like a goal. I never call them resolutions, but I know what people mean, like what are you going to try to do this year that's better than what you did last year.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, it's a moment to reflect. Yeah, I agree and think about what you want to maybe self-improve.

Speaker 2:

I'm not eating this year, so Well, I'll ask you about that, but I to answer your question, I think my resolution this year is to A be a better friend.

Speaker 1:

To who Me?

Speaker 2:

To all my friends to make sure that I'm calling people regularly, texting people regularly, because I can be pretty bad at that.

Speaker 1:

I mean, I don't feel that way, but I'm probably the one.

Speaker 2:

Well, you're up there on my list of people that I talk to more often. But I do have other friends that I don't talk to as often and I'm like, oh, I should. So those people, I'm trying to be a better, I'm trying to be a better friend. But also because I realized like I don't have that many friends and I think as I get older and this is just like a I guess this is like the selfish part of me is like, oh, as I get older, I'm going to need to rely on other people more, like I'm going to need to have a really good set of friends that I can rely on. So, but am I being the best friend that I can be?

Speaker 2:

And I don't think that. I think because of my, because of, like running my own business and like how into work I've always been, I've really like neglected friendship and not made it a priority. Like I just kind of keep to myself. I'm in my house most of the time. I'm working, I'm editing, I'm not really out there like making an effort. So I want to, I want to fix that and I want to, I want to get some more friends, because I'm fine with having you're trying to replace me.

Speaker 1:

No is what you're saying.

Speaker 2:

No, I'm, I have, I've always been the kind of person who has four or five really close friends and that's it. But I think I should four, I should have four and five. Yeah, I agree, I think I, but I think I should have four or five really close friends but then also have, you know, 10 to 20 friends who are just. They're not I'm not insanely close with them, but I'm close enough with them that, like you know, you should be coming to have a party and you yeah, you should be coming to you should be coming to the barbecue.

Speaker 2:

You should be hanging out my backyard, you should be like I should be cooking a steak for you and then if I ever need anything.

Speaker 1:

We have 20 people.

Speaker 2:

Steak's going to get pricey, I know, but like, if you do that, a couple yeah, but if you do it a couple of times a year like who cares, sure you know it's like, it's like I'm just realizing like, oh, there's more to life than me. Just like sitting in my office and trying to get the next video done.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, and so I that's, that's that's my to answer your question.

Speaker 2:

that's my New Year's resolution Be a better friend and make a few more friends.

Speaker 1:

Well, don't replace me, but, um, you know, my life has been pretty proactive about making new friends. Since we moved here, she joined like multiple book clubs. None of them are reading that pregnancy book. She has some girls that she plays tennis with now and she's thinking about joining a gym or something Like a women's only kind of gym or curves.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, I mean, I've never really well, you know, I've been feeling kind of weird about you know, when I first moved here, like you remember, every time I called you you'd be like, what are you doing? Like I'm on my way to a networking event. I was going to a networking events three, four times a week and I did that for like a year and then I ended up hanging out with people, you know, and I took improv classes and I met people and worked with them on projects outside of that and, um, you know, and then I had a writing partner and I just, you know, we worked on a couple of cool things and he, he took me to a lot of cool places and I met a lot of cool people and, like, I don't know, I just, uh, then I got that, I took that, I took that job, you know, in Texas all summer and I was like, well, I guess I'll get back to networking and stuff when I came back. But I kind of didn't. And then it's just like been one excuse after another. And then now I'm just going like, oh, I was like I was cool and hip and had stuff going on for like one year. I had like a, I was really getting out there.

Speaker 1:

And now I'm just, you know, sitting on my couch, just annoyed that I can't find anything on TV that I want to watch. It's not good, it's not, you know. So I'm like as much as it makes me uncomfortable to go to those things. And just you know cause? You're kind of like you show up, you're standing in the corner and you're like, god, I fucking, what am I even doing here? Nobody gives a shit about me, nobody wants to talk to me. I hope I can maybe meet one person or something. And then, like you talk to somebody and like conversation fucking goes nowhere and you're like, what do you want?

Speaker 2:

to do.

Speaker 1:

I want to do this, I want to do that. Well, neither of us have any fucking prospects. So I don't even know why we're talking to each other, because it's not like I can hire you and you can't hire me, you know.

Speaker 1:

I mean, I don't know, like it's, it's it's really uncomfortable, but I think it's a necessary and discomfort Cause, like, when I look back at it, like I really felt like I had momentum and I was doing stuff and I was, I was feeling more connected to the city and and, um, you know, I was like, yeah, people are starting to know me and you know I was doing. You know I did a couple of the short contests and you know, I was feeling like I was having friends and now I'm just, I just feel like, what the fuck am I doing out here? You know, so I maybe I didn't, I hadn't thought about it, but now that you said it, I think I should adopt your, your resolution, soon, as I'm done fasting for the next. I was going to do a 21 day fast. Geez, why I've never done it before. Why? Cause I'm a hundred pounds overweight.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, but that's, I wouldn't do that, but also well, also because, because I've been like, I've been reading about it and you know, like watching videos and and reading, uh like a lot of people on Reddit and and uh like smart, smart doctors and stuff, but also just regular people that are like this is what I did, this was my experience. This is my photos. Blah, blah, blah. And it seems that, um, it gets easier Like the hardest part, like if you just Google what is the hardest day of a fast, it's day two. So I'm through that and, um, a lot of people say that like after about seven to nine days or so, you kind of like all of a sudden start feeling really good, you have like a ton of energy. It's like, once you're fully in ketosis and your body is fully adapted to just burning your fat, um, that, uh that people say like a week two was pretty easy and week three was like a total cakewalk.

Speaker 2:

You don't even think about it, and so I'm like I don't know much about the longer ones, but my buddy, who's a team USA wrestler three time all American physiology, like really insanely like into fitness and stuff. He's like even a 24 hour fast can be really beneficial if you only drink water and go for a hike on the day of the fast.

Speaker 1:

He's like well, I walked the dog. I don't know if that counts as a hike.

Speaker 2:

I don't know. I don't know if I would do more than three days personally, but I saw I'm not going to knock what you're doing, I think it's. I honestly am like pretty impressed. I actually was thinking. I've actually been thinking about doing one within the next month and you're you don't really have any fat to lose. That's what you think. Not when you die, not when you're trying to get a six pack.

Speaker 1:

Oh, are you trying to get a six pack?

Speaker 2:

Yeah.

Speaker 1:

Have you ever had one? No, did you have one like when you're in college or high school or anything.

Speaker 2:

No. Yeah, I don't think you know what I would have though I would have if I had been doing the exercise as necessary to get my abs to that size?

Speaker 1:

Uh-huh.

Speaker 2:

Because I didn't really have much fat on me Like I weighed 120 all through high school. So had I ever like done any real like workout like I probably would have, but I never did was probably low enough that if you had muscle you would have never seen it Right.

Speaker 1:

I don't think a six pack is possible for me. I mean, you know I was talking.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, so I was talking to the same dude that I just mentioned about that, because he had a dude come in and do a workout and we filmed it. And I was like man, that guy's, like he used to play for like Nebraska, he was on like the football team there and like he was like a fit guy and he was doing this really hard workout that I filmed and I was like so, and then I was after he left, I was like I was asking my buddy like why, how is that guy like doing these workouts? But he's like so big, like he's kind of built like you, and I was like would that guy ever like not have like a gut or like because I'm like he's able to do these crazy workouts Like you would think?

Speaker 1:

he's very strong.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, Like you would think he would be like burning fat and stuff and he's like, yeah, he could lose some weight, but like his body type is such that you wouldn't, really he's probably never going to like he wouldn't be chiseled.

Speaker 2:

And it's more of like a. He made it sound like it was more of a body type situation and not really like. It's like yeah, I mean, I guess if he stopped eating and he lost like an insane amount of body fat, but then he's going to be losing a lot of strength and a lot of muscle mass and like he's like some people just aren't really built for that. He's like some people are just built to be bigger.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, I which is like, I guess is why you see like the, you know the linemen and the NFL and stuff, those dudes are like working out all the time, you know, but they still have these giant stomachs and stuff.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, I think if I were ever to get you know my body fat percentage low enough that a six pack could show up, the other thing that would be showing up would be just a tremendous amount of loose skin. So, like I can't, I can't ever be like a very, very skinny person, because that would look even fucking worse.

Speaker 2:

I don't think you're going for super skinny no.

Speaker 1:

But my goal was just to feel better. I mean, look, look a little bit better and like, just feel better in my clothes or whatever. But my goal was to feel better for the show.

Speaker 2:

Whatever you were in college, as long as you weren't like insanely unhealthy in college which I guess some people are, but like if you feel like college or high school or whatever was like, oh, that was my prime. Whatever your prime was, I think that's generally like the target.

Speaker 1:

I mean I always, you know, in college, you know I was overweight. I mean I started getting overweight when I was like in sixth grade and I went from. I saw I started wrestling in high school and I went from like two 15 to like 171 was what and 171 is where I'm, you know, weighing in.

Speaker 1:

So really I'm dehydrated 171. But like in college, you know, I bloomed up to like 300 pounds or something and then I did P90X and I got down to the 230s and around 230. I don't look like dang that guy's skinny or like dang that guy's really fit or anything, but I just look like a, like a totally average, just a regular dude at like, about 230 pounds, so I think, and I can wear a large T-shirt. So I think if I could get down to 230, I'd probably look like you would be, like you'd be shocked, I think, because I think I'd look like a very different person. But if I could get down to 171 again, like in high school wrestling when I was a sophomore, yeah, that would be. They'd have to make a documentary about me, it'd be so little.

Speaker 2:

What would it be called?

Speaker 1:

I guess you have to come up with that. I don't know. I know you thought I was gonna come up with something clever. I tried for like a good three seconds. I had nothing.

Speaker 2:

Well, man, this was a good episode. I'm glad we reconnected. You'll have to let me know if your wife gets pregnant anytime soon. What are you okay? Leave me with this. What are the odds that you and your wife have a baby Like? Is it 51% you will, or 49% you won't? I mean the way she was crying, I would say probably.

Speaker 1:

I would say, we're probably 65%.

Speaker 2:

Wow 70% gonna have a kid, wow, well, you better get on, but I don't know, because it doesn't get any easier.

Speaker 1:

But I don't know what the timeline is.

Speaker 2:

The timeline is if you feel like it's gonna happen, whether you want it to or not, you better do it now, cause you don't want to be older. You don't want to be any older. It only gets harder.

Speaker 1:

Well, the other thing is, I feel very strongly that if you have a kid, you should have two.

Speaker 1:

And so yeah, I don't know. I don't know. We both are open to the idea of adoption, but I don't really think that's an option either, because it's, first of all, very expensive and then, second of all, somebody has to choose you. Usually A parent has to, especially if you want to adopt a baby or whatever. A parent has to look at all this stack of all these wealthy gay dudes and who's gonna?

Speaker 1:

I'm an atheist with no real job. With no real job. I'm an atheist with a really unstable income. Who the fuck would choose me to father their baby that they don't want?

Speaker 1:

So and then, even if you like somebody does, like our realtor was talking to us about it. He's a gay dude and him and his husband adopted a little girl and there was a baby and I think he told me it was like $90,000. And it took him like a year, and they said that they feel very, very lucky because they have a lot of friends that went down that road for years and years and were never able to get one. And I'm like fuck. So then there's foster right, you could foster kids and then, if you are in the foster system long enough which, as a parent, whatever, eventually you know you're gonna foster in a kid that just nobody fucking wants them back, so you can just keep it. But I'm okay with that.

Speaker 1:

But the idea is that how many kids are gonna come and you're gonna get attached to them and then you're gonna lose them, and that I don't think I could go through. Like when we found my dog, you know, we put up flyers and stuff like hey, found dog. And then like six days later I went and took down all the flyers. I'm like this is my fucking dog, I'll kill somebody if they come try to take him back. So imagine I have some you know kid living in my house for 13 months or something you know, and I think I'm raising him and then all of a sudden they're like oh well, his mom didn't do crack for three whole weeks, so now she gets her baby back and then we're just gonna be sitting there crying Like fuck that.

Speaker 2:

So I feel like that probably doesn't happen all that often.

Speaker 1:

It does and it happened to some of my good friends and they were fucking devastated.

Speaker 2:

Try before you buy. I like that. Try before you buy.

Speaker 1:

Do you remember there was a movie about that called Rent a Kid?

Speaker 2:

No.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, these kids were like having a hard time adopting and so this guy came up with a just take him up for the weekend policy. And then of course they you know they fall in love with the kids.

Speaker 2:

I don't know, maybe, hey, maybe by the next time the podcast airs, you'll have some more news. No no no, a little news.

Speaker 1:

First of all, how long do you think it's gonna take to wash like 20 years or at the birth control out of our system? And then, second of all, who knows if my fat balls could even make a baby? And then, like chances are, we can't even conceive anyway. I did tell her like, go ahead and just quit taking birth control and then let's just see what's happening. And if you're not pregnant in two years, I guess then we can talk about like if you wanna, you know, do something about it. And she was like no, I'm not ready. I'm like then why'd you fucking bring this shit up and ruin Christmas?

Speaker 2:

All right, it's the most wonderful time of the year. I'll see you next week Later.

Streaming vs. DVD/Blu-Ray
Film Editing and Future Parenthood Challenges
Contemplating Parenthood and Pressure
Start Family, Choose Career
Dishwasher Troubles and Camera Lens Preferences
EF vs. PL Mount
New Year's Resolution
Discussion on Fasting and Body Composition
Considerations for Parenthood and Adoption
Discussions About Parenthood and Birth Control